Malawi

John Khayia – Malawi

John Khayia is the one reporter at Galaxy FM whose belief can be challenged by other journalists because it defies one of the core tenets of news telling, objectivity. Khayia believes reporters should go beyond accounting for what happened.

“I feel that is where we miss itÀ, he starts explaining. “Reporters should strive to cover issues but also unearth solutions to issues affecting our society. I feel a reporter should be emotionally attached to the story and sources because in so doing our success will not be measured by the number of the article but the problems we would have helped to solvedÀ.

August 31, 2015

Joab Chakhaza – Malawi

While the 2014 Tripartite Election will go down in history as the most controversial due to the irregularities that marred it, Joab Chakhaza says the election will go in his story as a huge gender learning point. He remembers that whilst his team thought they were doing a commendable job in having the first ever debates in Malawi democratic history, they had all overlooked one important thing that Joab would learn through a phone call, and that is gender balance.

August 31, 2015

Amon Lukhele – Malawi

Amon Lukhele – Malawi

Gender Links (GL) and its interventions and the SADC Gender Protocol were mere rhetoric to me before 2013. At first I thought that women were not important in decision making. Through my relationship with GL I have learnt to reshape people’s consciousness and to redefine social relations to create a women-centered culture.

August 31, 2015

Francis Chikunkuzeni, Malawi

Francis Chikunkuzeni, Malawi

Francis Chikunkuzeni is a Lecturer at Malawi Polytechnic, and teaches Media Theory, Media Regulation and Global cultures. He details his experience with Gender Links as a phenomenal experience that has contributed positive change in his life.

Alaudin Osman – Malawi

Alaudin Osman – Malawi

Following his encounter with Gender Links, Al felt motivated to increase the number of female employees at the station. His commitment has led to tangible strides in increasing the number of women in all departments. “I believe we have certainly made tremendous achievements in gender equity, since women currently constitute over 40% of the workforce.”

Alefa Lyson – Malawi

Alefa Lyson – Malawi

For many girls and women out there, poverty and gender violence take a blame for incarcerating them in a despondent situation. They say they could have succeeded in life if they had enough things, such as a better home. However, the story is different for Alefa Lyson. She is only 25, and besides heading the gender reporting desk at Power 101 radio, Lyson is a brain behind a number of gender related programmes at the radio station.

June 30, 2015 Themes: Economics | Education | Gender based violence | Media Programs: Women in Media

Edith Mkwaila – Malawi

Edith Mkwaila – Malawi

Even outside of the professional sphere, Edith applies these viewpoints to her personal life. “I remember a Gender Links discussion that taught me about the ‘male companion’ not as superiors, but seeing men as equals. When you have this mind-set, you will do it without fear and that inferiority complex.” Edith endures despite the hurdles, pressing on to ensure that women in both her professional and personal life have an equal footing. “I do it bit by bit. Gradually I can see the change, and I’m proud but I know we can do better.”

June 30, 2015 Programs: Women in Media

Hilda Phiri – Malawi

Hilda Phiri – Malawi

I have always wanted to work in the media and bring about change. When Gender Links came to train us on women’s economic empowerment, we thought that although we are a small radio station we could try implement what we learnt to bring change to society. Pushpa Jameson, GL former country facilitator taught us that if women are empowered economically, the gender based violence prevalence rate could go down. Thinking of how best I could integrate this into our programming and projects, the first thing that came into my mind was Women’s Radio Listening Clubs. This thought triggered another idea, village banking.

June 30, 2015 Programs: Women in Media

Charles Malunga – Malawi

Charles Malunga – Malawi

Malunga plans to use his position at Radio Maria Malawi to advance women’s rights. Malunga would like to see to it that the radio adopts the gender policy that has been gathering dust at the station since it was drafted with the assistance of Gender Links two years back. Meanwhile, Malunga has begun resuscitating the gender committee of the radio to oversee all gender related issues that the radio would wish to undertake.

June 30, 2015 Programs: Women in Media

Mcpherson Maulana – Malawi

Mcpherson Maulana – Malawi

McPherson believes Gender Links needs more men to communicate the gender message to men. “Men need to speak to men. So men understand it’s not just a female issue. More men need to be involved in change; this way we could have a rapid response. I have the same influence as a communicator on the radio, and also because people know me as a writer. We need to impart information that discourages and educates people about practices that oppress women. I grew to despise chauvinism that creeps in; this make me appreciate the media dimension in my work.”

June 30, 2015 Programs: Women in Media