Tanzania

African Media Barometer – Tanzania 2010

The Friedrich Ebert Stiftung’s Southern African Media Project and MISA took the initiative to start the African Media Barometer in April 2005, a self assessment exercise done by concerned and informed citizens in each particular country according to a number of general, homegrown criteria. The benchmarks used have to a large extent been lifted from the African Commission for Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR) �Declaration of Principles on Freedom of Expression in Africa�, adopted in 2002, and attached to this report as appendix 1. (It was largely inspired by the groundbreaking Windhoek Declaration on Promoting an Independent and Pluralistic African Press [1991] and the African Charter on Broadcasting [2001].)

The ACHPR is the authoritative organ of the African Union mandated to interpret the African Charter on Human and Peoples’ Rights which is binding for all member states.

Tanzania: Young people and local communities at centre of International Women’s Day celebrations

Tanzania: Young people and local communities at centre of International Women’s Day celebrations

The Southern Africa Gender Protocol Alliance Secretariat this March joined the Tanzania Gender Networking Programme (TGNP) now Alliance focal point in Tanzania, to commemorate International Women’s Day on 7 March. Over 300 representatives including young girls, from the Network’s member organisations from across the country attended the commemorations held at the TGNP grounds in Dar es Salaam.

Market stall, Tanzania

Market stall, Tanzania
March 7, 2012 Themes: Business | Economics Programs: Gender & Media

Glass Ceilings: Women and Men in Southern African Media

Glass Ceilings: Women and Men in Southern African Media

The ‘Glass Ceilings: Women and Men in Southern African Media’ study is the most comprehensive audit ever undertaken of women and men in Southern African media houses. Spanning 14 countries over a year starting in July 2008, Gender Links (GL) conducted the study in partnership with a network of researchers, gender and media activists and partners in the Gender and Media Southern Africa (GEMSA) network as well as the Gender and Media Diversity Centre (GMDC).

February 29, 2012 Themes: Media Programs: Gender & Media | Glass Ceiling Research

Are current aid strategies marginalising the already marginalised? Cases from Tanzania

Engaging with and assisting marginalised communities remains a major challenge for governments of developing countries, as many national development strategies tend in practice to further marginalise chronically poor communities. Development aid strategies, including poverty-reduction initiatives, have focused primarily on economic development. As a result they have contributed to the erosion of the asset base of these communities, and in particular their access to natural resources. While questioning the impact of aid arrangements on the poorest and most vulnerable communities in society, this article recognises that current aid arrangements, such as national poverty-reduction strategies, have created an environment in which chronic poverty can be addressed by national governments and other stakeholders. The authors emphasise the need for greater sensitivity in the processes of planning and managing national development strategies that seek to reduce poverty, as well as a commitment to institutional arrangements that include marginalised groups in the country’s political economy.

Africa Media Barometer – Tanzania 2009 Report

Africa Media Barometer – Tanzania 2009 Report

The Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung’s Southern African Media Project took the initiative together with the Media Institute for Southern Africa (MISA) to start the African Media Barometer in April 2005, a self-assessment exercise done by Africans themselves according to home grown criteria. The project is the first in-depth and comprehensive description and measurement system for national media environments on the African continent. The benchmarks are to a large extend taken from the African Commission for Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR) “Declaration of Principles on Freedom of Expression in Africa”, adopted in 2002. This declaration was largely inspired by the ground-breaking conferences in Windhoek/Namibia on the “Independence of the Media” (1992) and the “African Charter on Broadcasting” (2001). By the end of 2006, 19 sub-Saharan countries were covered by the AMB. In 2007 those countries which started the exercise in 2005 were revisited. This report focusses on Tanzania.

Tanzania: End gender-based violence

Tanzania: End gender-based violence

Tanzania joined other countries around the world to launch the annual campaign to highlight issues around violence against women lt on 25 November 2011.

December 15, 2011 Programs: About the Alliance | SADC Gender Protocol & Alliance

Gender in the 2010 Tanzania elections

Gender in the 2010 Tanzania elections

This report provides a comprehensive overview of the gender, elections and media project run by Gender Links (GL), in Tanzania during the October 2010 elections that witnessed an increase in women’s representation in parliament from 30% to 36%. But women constituted a mere 12% of news sources, compared to the general average of 21% in the 2010 Gender and Media Progress Study (GMPS).

December 12, 2011 Themes: Elections | Media Programs: Gender & Media | Gender, media and elections | Training

The pain of economic and emotional trauma

The pain of economic and emotional trauma

I was born about forty years ago, the first born of four sisters. Like any Tanzanian, I studied in government schools, from pre-school to high school, and later I joined a college. I was among the well-educated educated women of the time, so getting married to an educated man was no problem for me.

GBI initiative in Tanzania is bearing fruit

The Gender Budgeting Initiative in Tanzania that began as an NGO process in 1997 has now been institutionalised within government with all line departments required to account for the gender responsiveness of their budgets.

September 30, 2011 Themes: Business | Economics | Protocol Programs: Protocol @ work | SADC Gender Protocol & Alliance