Daily Links Newsletter

I continue to live in fear of my life and my children’s life.

My name is Nomsa  I stay Ga-Mashashane, Mohlonong. I was married in the Mabotja family from 2007. Things were fine between me and my husband until 2013. In 2013 he […]

Marcha pelo fim da violência- 16 dias de activismo

Marcha pelo fim da violência- 16 dias de activismo

By Graça Maria- 11 December 2018- A Gender Links em parceria com Município da vila de Mandlakazi promoveram um debate debate em volta do papel dos partidos políticos na promoção […]

Changement climatique, la fin des potagers des femmes mauriciennes

Changement climatique, la fin des potagers des femmes mauriciennes

L’agriculture a été depuis la nuit des temps un moyen de subsistance dans un monde féroce. Elle a été aussi un moyen pour les femmes de se nourrir, ainsi que leurs enfants. Les femmes représentent 70% de la population mondiale qui vit au-dessous du seuil de pauvreté, leurs moyens de subsistance dépendant fortement de l’agriculture et de la pêche dans les zones côtières. En Afrique subsaharienne, 70 Á  80% de la production alimentaire des ménages dépend des femmes, la proportion étant de 65% en Asie et de 45% en Amérique Latine et dans les Antilles.

My father raped me

My father raped me

I was only nine years old when my father started having sex with me. I really cannot explain how it all started but there was no violence and he did not force me. I don’t know if I accepted because I was not a virgin.

Young woman committed to overcome double suffering

Young woman committed to overcome double suffering

Two years ago I travelled from my village in Zavala, in Inhambane Province to Maputo, Mozambique ´s capital, to undergo my third surgical fistula repair. I was 23 years old at the time and had been suffering from obstetric fistula for seven years, since the day I delivered a stillborn baby at my house with assistance from my mother, after hours in labour.

Small eco-business brings big changes for women

Small eco-business brings big changes for women

The Sahara desert grows by the size of New Zealand every year, engulfing what was once fertile land and reducing the variety and volume of crops that can be grown in the Sahel region of Africa. Failing rains and unpredictable weather patterns mean that even in fertile areas crops often fail.

The curtain comes down on COP 17, we bow out!

The curtain comes down on COP 17, we bow out!

As the curtain comes down on COP 17 today, 9 December 2011, the various players who came to deliberate on how best to assist in climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts will be heading back home to the four corners of the world. Faith based organisations, mineworkers, rural women, economic justice activists, scientists, journalists, economists, researchers, and youth, among other players, attended the conference. It’s now time to bow out!

Quote 1 March 2013

Emerging findings from prevalence studies on GBV in five SADC countries show that between one quarter and two thirds of women in these countries experience some form   of gender […]

March 1, 2013

Instructions on joining the Cyber Dialogues

The cyber dialogues will kick off with a face to face discussion on the topic of the day. You are welcome to organise group discussions and then log in! There will be chat rooms in English, French, Portuguese, Afrikaans, Swahili, isiZulu (Ndebele, Siswati), and Sotho (Tswana).

November 20, 2012 Programs: 16 Days of Activism 2011 | Gender Justice

Too tired for school

Too tired for school

When she was orphaned at 7 years, Margarida Tomas* quickly changed roles from a child into a “woman.’À Following the death of her parents, she went to live with her aunt in the Mozambican capital Maputo. Her aunt Anita convinced the girl’s other relatives that she would take care for her and send her to school, as no one in their rural home 700 kilometres north of Maputo had the capacity.

HIV spending cuts will hurt front line care workers

HIV spending cuts will hurt front line care workers

The tying of red ribbons on World AIDS day this year is happening in the shadow of a frightening prospect À“ the Global Fund to Fight Aids, TB and Malaria is in financial crisis. Not only will this have significant repercussions for prevention efforts and treatment for people living with HIV (PLWHA), but also for care workers, most of whom are women. After all, less money for prevention and treatment – who is likely to pick up the slack in providing home based care? Women and girls, of course.

Africa: Women encouraged to practice agro-ecology

Africa: Women encouraged to practice agro-ecology

Experts have said that in extreme El Nino years, agricultural production in Sub-Saharan Africa could drop by 20-50%. Women farmers are the main producers of staple crops and account for 90% of the rural poor’s consumption, meaning they will be badly hit by climate change.