English: Cyber dialogue summary for 2 December 2011, Gender and climate change


Date: December 6, 2011
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Cyber dialogue summary

CLIMATE CHANGE

Date: 2 December 2011

Theme: Energy and women’s safety

Facilitator: Saeanna Chingamuka (GL GMDC Manager)

M

F

Unknown

TOTAL

5

8

9

22

 

“Climate change,the time is now be part of the solution and not the problem help the woman around you to save her health and that of the pregnant mother by providing a clean environment.”- Kenya

“Seems most regions use charcoal for heating purposes therefore there is need to use and develop solar power in Africa cause the sun always shines!! A very cheap source of energy.”- Zambia

“How can we reclaim forests which are being dished out by politicians for political gains! There are no forests reserves to talk about, may be we encourage bee keeping and conservation farming.” À“ Swaziland

“We need gadgets and equipment for monitoring pollution otherwise we will continue just talking about the effects fof pollution without evidence.”- Zambia

“Climate change language is too technical. Noone can identify with it apart from the intellectual. It needs to be broken down to simple language the common woman in the village can understand.”- Kenya

CLIMATE CHANGE

1. Are there any corporations or industries in your country which are causing damage to the environment .If so how?

  • In Kafue one industry has been polluting the atmosphere through its stench ,foul smelling odour which becomes worse when the at mosphere is stable i.e when the wind is not blowing.
  • We have a lot of sugarcane processing companies that burn a lot of cane as well as sugar processing plants.
  • In Matshapa they pollute the water which is used by rural communities.
  • In Kafue there is a company that produces yeast with the waste being poured into a stabilisation pond,the air pollution has been going on for years without action being taken. Anybody living in the estates of Kafue is aware of that.
  • Polluion in Manzini is more than staple food ,its a stable habit.

Question 1: Which energy source do you rely on in your community?

  • In Muhoroni, Kenya we have a lot of sun so we use solar energy. We also use charcoal to look and lanterns for reading.
  • Trees for charcoal and firewood.
  • Paraffin is the number one source of energy in Kenya.
  • In Swaziland there is much energy sources but we rely on firewood.
  • We get the charcoal from the market and people who burn trees next to the road especially at the corner around Nandi hills escarpments.
  • We uses molasses and cow dung as a source of energy.The cow dung does not emit so much smoke at all and many women in Narok use it. The cow dung is packaged across the country. It is cheap and one ball goes for Sh7 and takes four hours on the jiko. It is also available at Toi market in Kibera and Kibuyu market in Kisumu. It is good because it has no carbon emmissions.
  • In Swaziland most common is electricity and firewood.
  • Wind energy is another option.


Question 2: What are some of the challenges with these energy sources?

  • Planting of trees is a man’s job. Culture does not allow women to plant trees or other cash crops.
  • How can we reclaim forests that are being dished out by politicians for political gain?
  • Women are supposed to plant vegetables, cassava and sweet potatoes and weed maize only.
  • Men plant cash crops especially among the Kisii and Kuria.
  • We do not replace the cut down trees.

Question 3: What are the alternative sources of energy that do not compromise women’s safety?

  • Solar energy and cow dung.
  • Our governments must start investing in the research of renewable sources of energy. That will assist us to protect the environment and not continue to cut down trees.
  • Wind energy is also another option.
  • Climate change, the time is now, be part of the solution and not the problem. Help the woman around you to save her health and that of the pregnant mother by providing a clean environment.


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