Joyce Katebe – Zambia

Joyce Katebe – Zambia


Date: July 1, 2015
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Women can change societies and countries for the better; women can and play a role in sustainable development. What a man can do, a woman can also do. Gender equality is what will help uplift women in the ravages of vulnerability.

My name is Joyce Nanayinza Katebe, I am 52 years old. I am married and I have three children, two girls and one boy. Both my girls have graduated from the University of Zambia and my son is in tertiary school perusing a diploma Information Technology programme.

I work for Kitwe city council and I hold the position of Chief of Human Resources. I am a holder of a diploma in Human Resource Management and at the moment I am currently a fourth year student perusing Bachelor of Arts in Development studies at Zambia Open University. I am also a third year student of Human Resource Management at The Copper belt University. I find Development studies more interesting and more educative in terms of how my country Zambia and Africa at large has been behind in terms of social, economic and political development.

I first met Gender Links in April 2009 during a workshop on Gender Based Violence held at then Young Women Christian Fellowship in Lusaka. This was a very memorable experience for me. GL has made me realise that women have been marginalised in society. The nature of my job is basically to carry out Human Resource functions, which encompasses recruitment of staff in the council planning, the development of human resources, the implementation and interpretation of conditions of services, handling of grievances and disciplinary matters of council employees, and the welfare of employees and promotions.

I subsequently worked with Gender Links again in 2009 at the Zambia Institute of Human resources Annual Conference, where the speaker highlighted issues of non-participation of women in social and economic development, and how resources are not equitably shared among Zambian Women, because there is no deliberate policy was in place to ensure equity, especially taking into consideration the disadvantaged position of women and girls. The speaker further went on to talk about how certain cultural beliefs and customs perpetuated gender imbalances which disadvantaged women, such as traditional ways of socialising girls and boys. These are perpetrated through formal and informal institutions such as schools, family, places of work and courts of law. Girls are socialised to become wives and mothers who are generally submissive, boys on the other hand are assigned roles which are highly valued and prepared for being decision makers.

Today, a lot has changed in my life. I am able to speak freely, express my views as a woman at any forum unlike previously when I thought that men had better ideas than women. As a transformed person in terms of gender equality, I have come to believe that all people are equal despite their gender. I am not influenced by traditional norms that depict women as house wives only; I can now openly denounce this harmful practice that is making women to be the tail and not the head. What a man can do, a woman can also do, so it is important to appoint women as decision markers.

Gender Links takes credit for this change in that it has taken a deliberate move to ensure that barriers that prevent equal and effective participation of women and men in the formal and informal education and employment are removed.

I want to thank Faides Nsofu for being a hard working person. She is a vibrant woman who has not only changed my life, but lives of many people through her hard work, making us aware that climate change has an impact on women.

Gender Links indeed it is an eye opener. I have been provided with knowledge to know that there has been a change in law by government on land acquisition which favours women, a law which was passed by government in 1996, the Land Act, cap 184 of the laws of Zambia which provide for ownership of land under customary tenure through title deeds. This act guarantees women, the majority of whom are in rural areas, the possibility of being land owners. This is empowerment.

I have acquired concrete skills through working with Gender Links. I am able to handle conflicts, communicate effectively, plan and budget for daily activities. The values that I have learnt are the promotion of human respect, economically and socially. Yes, I am now aware that I have the right as a woman to be economically empowered and that no one has the right to physically, emotionally and sexually abuse me. My change will greatly influence other people because they will be inspired by how I have progressed socially, spiritually and economically.

My future plan is to help my fellow women aim higher, to give them support in all they want to achieve, and also encourage young men to be focused in their lives and that they must have big dreams. Whatever I have achieved today, it is because I have been determined and I work extra hard. Women should never be intimidated. We can do it, we can change the world, we should not give up, let us work and support each other.

 

 


0 thoughts on “Joyce Katebe – Zambia”

charity says:

THIS IS A TRUE STORY GOING BY THE INTERACTION SO MANY PEOPLE HAVE HAD WITH THIS PERSON.MUCH AS SHE HAS ATTRIBUTED HER CHANGE TO GENDER-LINKS, I CAN SAY THAT WE ARE WHAT WE ARE BECAUSE OF WHAT WE ARE AND NOT BECAUSE OF WHO WE ARE. PEOPLE HELP US PERFORM OUR ASSIGNED DUTIES COMPETENTLY IF WE ARE CAPABLE TO ALSO SHOW PROOF THAT WE ARE CAPABLE AND WILLING TO CHANGE, WHETHER WE BE WOMEN OR NOT!!! SOCIALIZATION HAS A LOT TO DO WITH OUR COMPETENT WORK PERFOMANCE OR CULTURAL DISPOSITON AFTER WE ARE EDUCATED/ TRAINED, AND EDUCATION AND LOVE OF THE SURROUNDING ENVIRONMENT DEMANDS THAT WE DO OUR BEST WHETHER WE ARE WOMEN OR NOT!!!!!AND THAT LOVE THE THINGS WE DO.Faides is a very good example of a capable woman and who loves her work,

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