Report

Progress of the world’s women 2015-2016. Summary: Transforming economies, realizing rights

Twenty years after the landmark Fourth World
Conference on Women in Beijing, and at a time when
the global community is defining the Sustainable
Development Goals (SDGs) for the post-2015 era,
the international consensus on the need to achieve
gender equality seems stronger than ever before.1
Empowering women and girls is among the goals
aspired to by all, from grassroots organizations,
trade unions and corporations to Member States
and intergovernmental bodies. But how far has this
consensus been translated into tangible progress on
the ground, and what more is needed to bridge the
gaps between rhetoric and reality?
Drawing on promising experiences from around the
world, this Report proposes a comprehensive agenda
for key policy actors-including gender equality
advocates, national governments and international
agencies-to make human rights a lived reality for all
women and girls.
Governments in every region have made legally
binding commitments to respect, protect and fulfil
women’s human rights, recognizing their intrinsic
value as well as the synergies between women’s
rights and wider prosperity. Women’s access to
decent employment is not only likely to improve their
agency and the distributional dynamics within the
household but can also lift whole households out of
poverty

Beijing+20: Past, present and future. The representation of women and the United Nations system

The Beijing Platform for Action remains the most overarching blueprint for advancing women’s rights. Significantly, it mandates the full participation of women “in all spheres of society, including participation in the decision-making process and access to power, [as] fundamental for the achievement of equality, development and peaceÀ. This includes women’s participation in decision-making processes within the UN system.
The 20th anniversary of this landmark document represents an occasion to reaffirm the principles of equal representation of women in all institutions, and assess progress and challenges. Twenty years after the Beijing Conference, the United Nations system continues to face significant challenges in achieving the equal representation of women, particularly at senior decision-making levels.

Namibia Country Report 1995-2009 on the implementation of the Beijing Platform of Action Beijing+15

Namibia committed herself through the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action (BPFA) in 1995 to improve the condition and status of women. This report gives an account of the achievements and challenges faced in the implementation of the BPFA as well as future strategies to address them.

Democracy and Gender Equality: The Role of the UN

Women’s participation is a central element of democracy, and the nature and degree of women’s participation is a key indicator of the quality of democratic culture.

A high-level roundtable convened in 2011 gathered 150 policymakers, practitioners and academics working on various aspects of gender equality and democracy to review the UN’s work at the critical juncture between promoting gender equality and strengthening democracy worldwide. Their conversations revealed both challenges and opportunities for the UN in this area, based on lessons drawn from both research and practice.

Cases on women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their access to justice

The case summaries are based on in-depth case studies mapping women’s experiences of technology-related VAW and their attempts to access justice either through domestic legal remedy or corporate grievance mechanisms. The original case studies were documented as part of the Association for Progressive Communication’s (APC) seven-country research initiative, “From impunity to justice: Exploring corporate and legal remedies for technology-related violence against womenÀ , conducted in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Kenya, Mexico, Pakistan and the Philippines. The project explored the adequacy and effectiveness of domestic legal remedies and corporate policies/redress mechanisms to address the issue of technology-related violence against women (VAW).

The in-depth case studies were developed by country partners between November 2013 and April 2014 and the summaries were prepared by Richa Kaul Padte. The case studies put the emphasison women’s voices and looking at how women exercise and negotiate agency in different situations and contexts. The case studies included interviewing survivors, lawyers, police officers and service providers. There were a total of 24 case studies conducted across 7 countries.

From impunity to justice: Improving corporate policies to end technology-related violence against women

The present report explores women’s experiences of and demands for corporate accountability in cases of technology-related violence against women (VAW). In-depth case studies on survivors’ experiences, their attempts to access justice, reviews of corporate policies, and interviews with public policy representatives have been evaluated with reference to (a) national telephony companies, (b) social media and networking platforms, and © pornography websites. A total of 24 case studies were documented across the seven countries, and the policies of 22 companies were reviewed. This report summarises some of the most common obstacles to resolving technology-related VAW under current corporate policy frameworks, and uses examples of existing company policies to shed light on best practices and possible solutions to women’s demands for corporate accountability.

From impunity to justice: Domestic legal remedies for cases of technology-related violence against women

The research was carried out across seven countries: Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), Kenya, Mexico, Pakistan and the Philippines. The present research aims to (a) identify available domestic remedies in cases of technology-related VAW, (b) analyse the strengths and limitations of available domestic legal remedies in relation to women’s experiences, © highlight the voices and experiences of survivors who have sought legal remedy and to identify insights from their experiences, and (d) develop recommendations for both ICT and VAW policies based on the research findings. An examination of the remedies for technology-related VAW focused on three elements: their adequacy and effectiveness, the culture of impunity, and survivors’ own agency and power.

The two central research activities were:

– Mapping domestic legal remedies through desk reviews/interviews
– Conducting in-depth interviews to gather women’s and girls’ experiences of accessing justice and compiling case studies.

A total of 24 case studies were documented across the seven countries, and each country’s domestic legal remedies were mapped.

Teen more likely to have sex with peers_Sowetan_7 April 2015

Gender bias wothout borders

Women the world over face stark disparities in health, finance, education, politics, and other arenas. Persistent gender inequality may threaten economic growth and/or social progress. At the most microlevel, discrimination impedes girls and women from achieving their individual hopes and dreams. Through its Millennium Development Goals, the United Nations has championed an increase in equality for women and girls across different sectors by 2015. Despite a push to promote females worldwide, one example of where progress remains stagnant is the U.S. film industry.

My body, my rights

My Body My Rights is Amnesty International’s global campaign to stop the control and criminalization of sexuality and reproduction by governments and others. Over 2014-15, we are working for tangible change in people’s lives in Nepal, Burkina Faso, El Salvador, the Maghreb and Ireland, challenging stigma and breaking the silence that can surround these issues. The campaign seizes on a pivotal opportunity to remind world leaders of their obligations to respect, protect and fulfill sexual and reproductive rights as they negotiate a new global agenda to promote human rights, peace and security, and development beyond 2015. The UN Commission on Population and Development session in April 2014 is just one of a number of key milestones in this process.

The campaign seizes on a pivotal opportunity to remind world leaders of their obligations to respect, protect and fulfill sexual and reproductive rights as they negotiate a new global agenda to promote human rights, peace and security, and development beyond 2015. The UN Commission on Population and Development session in April 2014 is just one of a number of key milestones in this process.