The I Stories: Swaziland 2008

R150.00

The “I” Stories is an annual project of Gender Links (GL), in collaboration with partnering organisations, to share first hand accounts of women and men affected by gender based violence. The Gender and Media Southern African (GEMSA) Network is an umbrella organisation of individuals and institutions who work to promote gender equality in and through the media. Swaziland Media and Gender Watch (SMEGWA) was established in April 2004 as an independent media body in the tiny Kingdom of Swaziland to promote media freedom and professionalism. SMEGWA is also a member of the GEMSA network.

From the editor…

“Being a woman is very difficult, especially in our country, Swaziland. The reason behind this statement is that in our culture a woman is considered a child and has no say when it comes to decision-making. Moreover, in our society women are not given the chance to voice their opinions. Issues on gender based violence still need to be given serious attention because many people still have the mentality that it is a domestic issue (tibi tendlu) and that it should be swept under the carpet. We still have a lot to do in sensitising people that violence against women is inhumane, and it’s a crime.”

 

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Description

The “I” Stories is an annual project of Gender Links (GL), in collaboration with partnering organisations, to share first hand accounts of women and men affected by gender based violence. The Gender and Media Southern African (GEMSA) Network is an umbrella organisation of individuals and institutions who work to promote gender equality in and through the media. Swaziland Media and Gender Watch (SMEGWA) was established in April 2004 as an independent media body in the tiny Kingdom of Swaziland to promote media freedom and professionalism. SMEGWA is also a member of the GEMSA network.

From the editor…

“Being a woman is very difficult, especially in our country, Swaziland. The reason behind this statement is that in our culture a woman is considered a child and has no say when it comes to decision-making. Moreover, in our society women are not given the chance to voice their opinions. Issues on gender based violence still need to be given serious attention because many people still have the mentality that it is a domestic issue (tibi tendlu) and that it should be swept under the carpet. We still have a lot to do in sensitising people that violence against women is inhumane, and it’s a crime.”

 

Additional information

Publication Year

Written By Gender Links
November 2008

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